Verdicchio vs Chardonnay

CharacteristicsVerdicchioChardonnay
HuePale lemon to strawPale lemon to deep gold
ColorWhiteWhite
AromasCitrus, green apple, oily, almondApple, pear, citrus, butter, vanilla
SweetnessDry to off-dryDry to off-dry
AcidMedium plus to highMedium to high
Alcohol (%)12-13%12-15%
BodyLight to mediumMedium to full
IntensityMedium to pronouncedMedium to pronounced
Key Growing RegionsItaly (Marche, Umbria), CaliforniaFrance (Burgundy, Chablis), California, Australia – Most Major Winegrowing Regions
Classic PairingsPoultry, salads, light pasta dishesChicken, risotto, seafood, creamy dishes
Price Range$15-$40$8-$50

Comparing Verdicchio vs Chardonnay is a fun exercise because some styles of Chardonnay and Verdicchio can seem similar.

Verdicchio is light to medium bodied with citrus, green apple, almond and an oily texture. Chardonnay is fuller-bodied with a wider range of citrus, stone, and even tropical notes. Both are medium alcohol.

TL;DR: If you like lean styles of Chardonnay, like Chablis, you’ll probably like Verdicchio. If you enjoy buttery, full-bodied styles of Chardonnay, you may not enjoy Verdicchio.

Here’s what you need to know about Verdicchio vs Chardonnay.

Verdicchio Basics: White Italian Gem

what's verdicchio wine taste like - verdicchio vs chardonnay

Verdicchio grows in the Umbria and Marche regions of Italy where it makes an aromatic, bright white wine with peach, lemon, and green apple. Higher-quality versions of Verdicchio will have an almond note to them. Discover more in the complete Verdicchio wine guide.

Fun Wine Fact: Verdicchio was once more popular than Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc!

Chardonnay: The Famous White

what's chardonnay wine taste like infographic - verdicchio vs chardonnay

Chardonnay is the most popular white wine in the world. Also from France, Chardonnay crafts wines that differ depending on the growing climate, from steely and acidic with minerality, to luscious stone and tropical fruits.

Chardonnay is often called a winemaker’s grape because the winemaker can play with different winemaking techniques to make different styles of Chardonnay.

Helpful Tip: Go check out this complete guide to Chardonnay wine.

Wine Comparison: Verdicchio vs. Chardonnay

Here’s a quick side-by-side that covers the most common styles of Verdicchio and Chardonnay.

Verdicchio Wine Profile

  • Sweetness: Verdicchio wines lean towards dryness, offering a range of dry to off-dry styles.
  • Alcohol: Verdicchio wines typically have medium alcohol content, similar to Chardonnay, ranging from around 11% to 14% ABV.
  • Body: Verdicchio is known for its lighter to medium body, lighter than Chardonnay.
  • Acid: Verdicchio displays vibrant acidity, similar or slightly higher than Chardonnay wines.
  • Flavor and Aroma Intensity: Verdicchio expresses refreshing citrus notes along with green apple, peach, almond, and an oily quality.

Chardonnay Wine Profile

  • Sweetness: Chardonnay wines cover the spectrum from bone-dry to off-dry. Less expensive Chardonnay often has a little residual sugar from unfermented grape juice in it for sweetness.
  • Alcohol: Chardonnay wines generally have a moderate alcohol content, ranging from around 12% to 14% ABV.
  • Body: Chardonnay exhibits a diverse range of body, from light and crisp to full and creamy, depending on winemaking choices.
  • Acid: Chardonnay can showcase a broad spectrum of acidity, from vibrant and zesty to more rounded and soft.
  • Flavor and Aroma Intensity: Chardonnay’s profile varies widely, with notes of green apple, citrus, tropical fruit, and sometimes hints of vanilla and butter.
  • Styles: Styles range from unoaked, highlighting bright fruit, to oaked, introducing creamy textures and nuances of oak influence.

Are Verdicchio and Chardonnay Similar?

Verdicchio is similar to high-acid, linear styles of Chardonnay, like Chablis. Both wines will forefront citrus and mineral notes.

What Is the Difference Between Verdicchio and Chardonnay?

Verdicchio has a distinctive oily quality and an almond skin note to it. Chardonnay has a wider range of aromas and flavors, from citrus to tropical. Chardonnay often goes through oak aging to give it toasty aromas and flavors.

Helpful Tip: Just getting started with white wine tasting? Here’s how to pick out aromas in white wines.

Verdicchio vs Chardonnay: Food Pairings and Serving Temperature

risotto - verdicchio vs chardonnay white wine comparison
  • Verdicchio wines work well with lighter cuisines thanks to their zesty acidity. Think coastal seafood dishes, shellfish, and light salads. The wine’s acid compliments these dishes and naturally accentuates their flavors with a refreshing touch. 
  • Chardonnay, with its many styles, pairs well with a range of foods, from seafood to grilled chicken and even heartier dishes like lobster or roasted pork.

Personal Note: Here’s a list of my 5 favorite everyday Chardonnay wine pairings for normal people.

Chardonnay and Verdicchio Wine Serving Temperatures

WineServing Temperature (°F)Serving Temperature (°C)
Verdicchio45-50°F8-10°C
Chardonnay50-54°F10-12°C

Both wines are best enjoyed chilled. 

Place them in the refrigerator overnight or for a few hours before serving. For both wines, remove the bottle from the refrigerator approximately 10-15 minutes before pouring to reach the ideal serving temperature.

Helpful Tip: If you’re just getting started with wine, head over to the post that covers just the basics of food and wine pairing. 

Which Is More Expensive, Verdicchio or Chardonnay?

Verdicchio vs chardonnay - wine shop shelf

It’s natural to want to compare the price of Verdicchio vs Chardonnay, so here’s what you need to know.

Quality LevelVerdicchioChardonnay
Entry-level$15-$20$8-$12
Premium$25-$40+$20-$50+

How Much Does Chardonnay Cost?

  • Chardonnay, with its widespread availability, caters to various budgets. Entry-level Chardonnays are accessible, often in the $8-$12 USD range. 
  • A higher quality bottle, for example, a 90+ point Chardonnay from Burgundy, France, starts around $35 USD, but you can find beautiful 90+ Chardonnays from other regions for under $20 USD as well. Shop around! 

Helpful Tip: Chardonnay is a wine that you’ll find at your local grocery store. Check out this post for 9 quick tips on how to buy great grocery store wines.

Verdicchio Cost

  • Entry-level Verdicchio wines also fall within accessible price ranges, usually ranging from $12 to $20 per bottle. These wines are accessible and bright.
  • On the premium side, Verdicchio will have more intense fruit flavors. Premium Verdicchio wines will usually cost between $25 – $35 per bottle but can cost $40+.

Which Is Better? Chardonnay vs Verdicchio

If you love citrus-driven, lighter styles of white wine with bright acid and an almond note, then Verdicchio is the better wine. If you like fuller bodied white wines with a wider range of fruit aromas, then Chardonnay is the better choice. If you’re on a budget, then Chardonnay can be less expensive than Verdicchio.

Final Thoughts – Verdicchio vs Chardonnay

Verdicchio and Chardonnay are two fun white wines to compare. Verdicchio has that classic citrusy core with layered complexity thanks to its almond and oily nature. Chardonnay is a true winemaker’s grape that can have many different expressions depending on the growing region and winemaker’s style.

The best way to learn about Verdicchio and Chardonnay is to do a side-by-side tasting. Grab two bottles of similarly priced Verdicchio and Chardonnay, gather some friends, and pop those corks!

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I’m a big believer in side-by-side tastings to enhance your wine knowledge. Here’s how to host your own wine tasting for beginners.

Hosting a wine party? Check out this wine calculator that will tell you exactly how much and what kind of wine you’ll need.

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